INFORMATION

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Morning Security Brief: Thai Army Declares Martial Law, Chinese Retaliate Against Cyber Charges, Missing Jet Update, and More

- Thailand's army has declared a state of martial law in a surprise move. The Chinese government speaks out against U.S. charges of cyber espionage against five members of its People's Liberation Army. A global satellite communications firm will release the communications log from missing Malaysian Flight 370. And shoppers express concern over new security measures at the checkout.

Who Really Needs A Security Clearance?

- Congress holds a hearing to discuss ways to improve the security clearance designation process for federal workers.

Infrastructure Protection

- The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released an updated National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) in December to help secure critical infrastructure assets, systems, and networks that Americans depend on in the new year. Along with the plan itself, DHS has also issued supplements for the plan geared towards helping the infrastructure community implement the plan, including sector-specific plans and resources for state and local partners.

Security Clearances

- More than 4.9 million federal government and contract employees hold, or are eligible to hold, a security clearance in 2012. However, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office, there is no clear defined policy guidance for determining when a federal position needs a security clearance.

Morning Security Brief: DHS To Create License Plate Database, Personal Healthcare Information at Risk, and More

- DHS plans to build a national database that stores information from license-plate readers that scan every car that traverses their path; the Wall Street Journal reports that healthcare information could be at risk through a file-sharing site used by hackers, and leaked documents from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden show an American law firm was under surveillance by the agency.

Data Breaches

- In 2012, federal agencies reported 22,156 data breaches, an increase of 111 percent from 2009. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that while most federal agencies have policies for responding to a data breach, all of those policies are different. The GAO made 23 recommendations to update and standardize federal agency response.

NSA Surveillance

- A federal judge has ordered the White House to declassify all of the legal opinions issued by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court after May 2011 that relate to Section 215 of the Patriot Act. In a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the judge noted that the disclosures made by Edward Snowden require greater transparency and that disclosure of the opinions is necessary for an informed debate on the issue of government surveillance and privacy.  

NIST Issues Updated Standard for Federal Identification Card to Strengthen Authentication Capabilities

- The National Institute for Standards and Technology has come out with an updated version of the standard specification Personal Identification Verification (PIV) Card used by government employees and contractors. It has a stronger authentication credential. It does not require existing cards to be replaced.

Post-Sandy Analysis Reveals Challenges, Successes for FEMA

- An evaluation of FEMA's response to Superstorm Sandy was published in July of this year, outlining challenges and successes for the federal agency in dealing with one of the deadliest and most destructive U.S. storms on record.

Tier Pressure to Curb Human Trafficking

- Experts analyze the effectiveness of the State Department’s rankings of countries based on their efforts to combat human trafficking around the world.

Morning Security Brief: NSA Privacy Violations, Clashes in Egypt, and Nuclear Vulnerabilities

- A leaked NSA internal audit from the Snowden files shows that the NSA's domestic surveillance program violated privacy thousands of times; violence continues in Egypt; and a study finds vulnerabilities in the nation's nuclear power plants.

Morning Security Brief: "Stop and Frisk" Ruling, Surveillance Controversy Continues, Drug Crime Sentencing Examined, and More

- "Stop and frisk" ruled unconstitutional; Critics say President Obama’s handling of the NSA surveillance scandal is insufficient; Attorney General Eric Holder has announced that low-level drug crimes will carry less severe penalties; most embassies in the Middle East reopen after terrorism scare; and more.

Morning Security Brief: NASA's Data Vulnerability, the Bradley Manning Verdict, Afghanistan Security Forces, and More

- As NASA moved data to the cloud, a new report says it has not met security requirements; Afghanistan's private security monopoly is raising concerns; the Bradley Manning verdict on whether he 'aided the enemy' is expected today, and more.
 




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