INFORMATION

Site Map - Government Reports (GAO etc.)

IT Technology Primer

- A buyers guide for managers who need to understand security technologies is now available from the General Accounting Office (GAO).

Muslim Engagement

- Read the British government’s strategy for confronting Muslim radicalization and promoting moderate Islam in the fight against violent extremism.

Cargo security

- Some of the vulnerable areas cited in the aforementioned report, including border and cargo security, have been the subject of recent scrutiny by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO). GAO auditors, for instance, recently checked on the status of the US-VISIT (United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology) program, finding that it is "inherently risky, both because of the type of program it is and because of the way it is being managed." Specifically, US-VISIT is inherently risky because it is responsible for a critical, multifaceted mission; has a large and complex scope; must meet a demanding implementation schedule; and entails enormous cost. Risks relating to management include initial reliance on integrating existing systems that have problems. In testimony on cargo inspection, the GAO's Richard M. Stana noted that the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) fails to incorporate key elements of a risk management framework in its approach to risks posed by oceangoing cargo containers. CBP, Stana told the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, House Committee on Energy and Commerce, hasn't determined the level of risk for cargo or the responses necessary to mitigate that risk. Moreover, CBP hasn't subjected its method of selecting and inspecting cargo containers to external peer review or testing, he said.

Contracting Computer Troubles

- Security is only as strong as the weakest link in the chain, so even organizations with the most well-thought-out security programs can be jeopardized if their partners' security practices are lax. This is true of the Department of Defense as well its Defense Security Service, which monitors the information-security programs of more than 11,000 contractors, "cannot identify systemic vulnerabilities and make corrective changes to reduce the risk of information compromise" from contractors.

Contracting Computer Troubles

- Security is only as strong as the weakest link in the chain, so even organizations with the most well-thought-out security programs can be jeopardized if their partners' security practices are lax. This is true of the Department of Defense as well its Defense Security Service, which monitors the information-security programs of more than 11,000 contractors, "cannot identify systemic vulnerabilities and make corrective changes to reduce the risk of information compromise" from contractors. The GAO report, which includes Haave's response, is at SM Online

Airport screener

- At a hearing held by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee's Subcommittee on Aviation, lawmakers heard testimony regarding the pilot program established by the government to evaluate private airport screening programs.

Critical infrastructure protection

- The House Select Committee on Homeland Security's Subcommittee on Infrastructure and Border Security and Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Science, Research, and Development held a joint hearing to discuss the relationship between the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and various private groups responsible for critical infrastructure. Witnesses at the hearing noted that information sharing plans are ongoing but are still in need of refinement. Complete witness testimony is available at SM Online.

Cargo security

- In a recent report on cargo security, the General Accounting Office (GAO) noted that while U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has taken steps to increase the security of cargo containers, it has failed to address the potential tampering of such containers. It has also failed to analyze various forms of cargo to assess specific risk factors.

Nuclear security

- The level of preparedness for an attack against the U.S. nuclear infrastructure continues to be hotly debated among congressmen.

Card technologies

- A recent government-sponsored workshop explored storage and processor cards, focusing on standards and capabilities. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) pulled together findings from the workshop and related interviews and questionnaires and has released them in report form.

Digging Deeper Into Data Mining

- Data mining--the process of poring through various databases looking for hidden patterns and relationships--is alive and well, despite controversy raised by projects such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Terrorism Information Awareness (TIA) program. In fact, 52 government agencies are using or are planning to use data mining for projects ranging from detecting criminal activities to improving service, according to a study by the General Accounting Office (GAO).

Digging Deeper Into Data Mining

- Data mining--the process of poring through various databases looking for hidden patterns and relationships--is alive and well, despite controversy raised by projects such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Terrorism Information Awareness (TIA) program. fact, 52 government agencies are using or are planning to use data mining for projects ranging from detecting criminal activities to improving service, according to a study by the General Accounting Office (GAO). Read "Safeguarding Privacy in the Fight Against Terrorism"

Aviation security

- A recent report by the General Accounting Office (GAO) on the use of biometrics in aviation security found that while the technology is available to meet the needs of airports, decision-makers should focus on the best equipment for the job regardless of whether it incorporates biometrics.
 




Beyond Print

SM Online

See all the latest links and resources that supplement the current issue of Security Management magazine.