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Legal Report

- The Supreme Court rules on using deadly force to stop a high-speed chase, a federal appeals court rules that tracking Americans’ movements using data from their cell phones requires a warrant, and both the United Kingdom and France have enacted laws stripping rights from terrorists.

Legal Report

- Courts consider whether Transportation Security Administration officers are immune from civil suits, and legislatures tackle data breaches and privacy.

Legal Report Resources

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Privacy

- Australia has enacted a new amendment that will broaden the definition of personal information and require more transparency from organizations on how that personal information is stored. The new law, The Privacy Regulation 2013, is part of the broader Privacy Amendment Act of 2012 and applies to companies with revenues of more than AUD 3 million that collect information, such as names, contact details, payment information, or other details related to a specific person, for any purpose.

Legal Report Resources

- Links to legislation and resources used in this month's Legal Report.

Parody

- The National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) settled a lawsuit with an activist who was selling merchandise using their logos. The NSA and DHS acknowledged that merchants who use images and names of government agencies on parody merchandise are not in violation of any federal laws.

Gun Rights

- The U.S. Supreme Court refused to re-enter Second Amendment gun controversies and denied to hear three cases seeking clarification on the scope of an individual’s right to have a gun for personal self-defense.

Employment

- A New York court has ruled that employees’ immigration status does not affect the employer’s rights under Workers’ Compensation Law section 11. Instead, employers have economic protections under the law regardless of employees’ immigration statuses.

Drones

- A federal judge dismissed a case challenging the Obama administration’s use of unmanned drones to kill terrorism suspects overseas. In her opinion, Justice Rosemary M. Collyer wrote that the courts cannot create a remedy for targeted killings without intruding on the powers of the president and Congress to wage war.

Whistleblowers

- The U.S. Supreme Court reversed a lower court’s opinion, ruling that whistleblower protection under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act includes employees of a public company’s private contractors and subcontractors. The plaintiffs had been employed by private companies that manage mutual funds for public companies that have no employees. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg delivered the Court’s opinion, writing that its interpretation of the law “protects the employees of investment advisors, who are often the only firsthand witnesses to shareholder fraud involving mutual funds.”

Gun Control

- A federal judge upheld Connecticut’s gun control law, which was passed after the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. In his ruling, the judge wrote that while the law “burdens” individuals’ Second Amendment rights, it is related to the government’s interest of public safety and crime control.

Data Brokers

- A federal court allowed a man to pursue legal action against an investigative service that provided his personal information to a data broker. The court ruled that the service “failed to use reasonable care” in distributing the man’s information, which was later used for an improper purpose.

Legal Report

- Court rulings on social media and the demotion of an untruthful federal employee are discussed. Also, California strengthens its data breach law, while Massachusetts introduces a bill to crack down on workplace bullying.
 




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