INFORMATION

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U.S. Supreme Court Rules that Police Need Warrant to Track Suspects

- The U.S. Supreme Court rules that the police must obtain a warrant before using GPS to track suspects.

Social Media

- A university did not violate a mortuary science student’s rights to free speech when it sanctioned her for writing that she wanted to “stab a certain someone in the throat” on her Facebook page. The court found that the student’s posts could be construed as serious threats and that the university had the right to address potentially threatening conduct.

Tasers

- A federal appeals court has ruled that police officers in two separate incidents engaged in unreasonable force when discharging their Tasers. However, because case law was not established at the time of the incidents, the officers are protected from liability.

Eyewitness Testimony

- The New Jersey Supreme Court has handed down a list of new rules regarding the admission of eyewitness testimony in court. Read the full ruling online.

Retaliation

- An assistant manager’s refusal to return the calls of an employee out on medical leave is sufficient to support a case of retaliation under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). In the case, an employee out on FMLA leave put in weekly calls to her assistant manager to provide an update. The manager never returned the calls and the employee was fired for not returning to work as agreed. The district court found that the failure to return calls indicated an “antagonistic attitude.”

Intelligence

- A major court ruling could change the way eyewitness testimony is viewed in court, and Chicago releases years of criminal data.

Legal Report

- A court rules that police officers acted unreasonably in using Tasers but they were protected under the law as it stood at the time of the incident.

New Jersey Judge Rules Police Can Keep Surveillance Locations Secret In Drug Case

- A New Jersey appellate court ruled on Monday that law enforcement officers can keep their surveillance locations a secret.

Survey: Many People Know About Workplace Misconduct and are Willing to Report it -- for Money

- Employees would report wrongdoing in the workplace if they could be protected from retaliation and claim a monetary reward, according to a recent survey, yet most people don't know about a government program that does just that.

Morning Security Brief: Americans As Enemy Combatants, Human Rights Monitoring, National Retail Security Survey, and More

- The CIA says it's legal to kill an American citizen abroad if they are fighting alongside the enemy. The Canadian Human Rights Commission wants security organizations to monitor and disclose their human rights performance. The final findings of the 2010 National Retail Security Survey published. And more.

Legal Report

- The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that its medical marijuana law does not apply to private employers and does not protect employees from being fired for drug use. And OSHA issues a new directive on workplace violence.

Legal Report

- A jury holds a property owner liable for negligent security and orders it to pay a rape victim $1.2 million, and lawmakers consider legislation on government contractors, online privacy, and homeland security.

Unreasonable Force

- A police officer is guilty of gross negligence after shooting an unarmed man. The officer, who claimed that he intended to draw his Taser, violated the law when he neglected to verify that he had mistakenly drawn his gun, according to a federal appeals court. The officer’s actions, ruled the court, were objectively unreasonable.
 




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