NEWS & ANALYSIS

Morning Security Brief: Black Boxes Handed Over, Food Safety Scare in China, Border Protection, and More

Russian rebels in Eastern Ukraine hand over the black boxes from downed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, a food safety scare in China affects several U.S.-based companies, Canada and the United States' trusted traveler programs announce they're making significant strides in their partnership, and more.

Morning Security Brief: World Cup Hacking Concerns, Undocumented Child Immigrants, Biosurveillance, And More

Hacking group Anonymous claimed it has, and will continue to, attack Web sites related to the World Cup in Brazil. An interagency group has been formed to address the 47,000 unaccompanied child immigrants that have entered the U.S. illegally. The future of BioWatch is discussed at a government hearing, and TweetDeck is hacked.

Morning Security Brief: Benghazi Report, NSA Surveillance Curbed, Indiana Store Shooting, And More

The State Department could have prevented the Benghazi attack, according to an Intelligence Committee Report. President Obama is expected to limit the NSA's phone surveillance program. And, a gunman killed two women before being shot down at an Indiana grocery store last night.

Morning Security Brief: U.N. Appeals for Syria Aid; Details on Snowden from NSA Coworker; Lebanese and Israeli Soldiers Shot

The United Nations has requested $6.5 billion in aid for Syria and neighboring countries, the largest such request for a single crisis ever. Forbes has published an article detailing Edward Snowden from a coworker's perspective, who describes him as a "genius among geniuses." Two Lebanese soldiers are shot after an Israeli soldier was killed along the border.

Morning Security Brief: NSA Data Center Stalled, Problems with Antibullying Programs, and More

The NSA's largest data storage center in the U.S. is experiencing electrical problems which will delay its opening. Experts question the effectiveness of antibullying programs. A new study shows more than 80 percent of phones lack security, and Russia is increasing its border security.

Morning Security Brief: Navy Yard Shooter Had Pattern of Misconduct, ACLU Releases Report on FBI Abuse of Power, And More

Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis acted alone and has a record of abusing firearms, the ACLU has released a report on the FBI's abuse of power after 9-11, and Colorado's oil and gas infrastructure has been damaged by the region's floods.

Morning Security Brief: U.S. Border Patrol Improves Training, Syrian Hackers Attack NYT, and More

The GAO reports that the CBP has improved officer training and management. The New York Times and Twitter were hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army. Plus India captures key terrorist.

Morning Security Brief: Crash Investigation, Private Sector Perks in Immigration Bill, and EU Demands Privacy Talks

The investigation begins into the crash of an Asiana Airlines jet in San Francisco; the new immigration under consideration in Congress includes billions in private sector projects; and the European Union demands privacy talks with the United States.

Morning Security Brief: Border Security, Cloud Forensics, and Trade Secret Theft

The Senate passed border security provisions as part of the immigration reform bill, a computer security group announces efforts to establish best practices on forensic investigations in the cloud, and the U.S. Department of Justice has charged a Chinese wind turbine manufacturer with theft of trade secrets from a U.S. company.

Morning Security Brief: Syrian No-Fly Zone and Arms to Rebels, Surveillance Testimony, NFL Security Bans, and More.

The United States considers plans to arm Syrian rebels and create a no-fly zone; the FBI director testifies on surveillance program; the NFL bans fanny packs; and a border security amendment to the immigration reform bill is rejected.
 




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