NEWS

Morning Security Brief: Cell Phone Records, Supreme Court Declines Illinois Eavesdropping Case, Norway Attack Footage, and More

By Carlton Purvis

►The NYPD has been amassing a cache of cell phone logs without a court order, the New York Times reports. When a phone is stolen, police pull data for all the incoming and outgoing calls from the phone. The information is entered into a searchable database for use in later investigations. Police won’t say how many records are in the database, how many have led to arrests, or if the information has been used to investigate other crimes. Police documents suggest that thousands of subpoenas for call logs have been issued to cell phone providers each year the Times reports.

►The Supreme Court on Monday reaffirmed a ruling by a lower court that found that an Illinois eavesdropping law violates the First Amendment. “By passing on the issue, the justices left in place a federal appeals court ruling that found that the state's anti-eavesdropping law violates free-speech rights when used against people who audiotape police officers,” the Chicago Tribune reports. In Illinois, recording an on-duty police officer is a felony. The ACLU asked the judge who heard the case to make permanent an injunction that temporarily bans state attorneys from prosecuting anyone under the law.

►Authorities have released surveillance video of terrorist Anders Behring Breivik parking a van full of explosives outside the Norwegian prime minister’s office and leaving in a separate car before launching the second phase of an attack last July. The bomb killed eight people. Breivik can be seen in the video exiting the van in a police uniform and getting into a separate car that he drove to the island of Utoeya and gunned down another 69 people. Breivik was sentenced to 21 years in prison in August.

►In other news, Camille Marino, the animal rights activist Security Management interviewed last year for a story about her organization’s harassment campaign against students and college professors, was arrested at Wayne State University after chaining herself to a school building after being banned from campus. She had previously threatened a Wayne State University professor. ♦ Forbes reports on a new SARS-like virus in the Middle East. ♦ And watch this Vice documentary about life in the Gaza Strip under Hamas.
 

 

Comments

View Recent News (by day)

 




Beyond Print

SM Online

See all the latest links and resources that supplement the current issue of Security Management magazine.